The following are Limited Edition Serigraphs along with a few Giclées.  If you're wondering what the difference is between a serigraph and a Giclée, it's like night

and day.  Serigraphy is one of the oldest forms of printing originating in China about

a thousand years BC.  Giclées on the other hand are created using the latest digital printing processes that continue to be refined as the technology progresses. 

Some of the following Limited Edition images are merely placeholders until I replace them with higher quality pictures from my archive of transparencies.  I decided to go ahead and pirate the best images I could find from various online galleries to get going.  Actually I'm pirating my own images which were previously pirated from me

by quite a few internet galleries selling my Limited Editions. 

 

Problem is the images get passed around from one gallery to another, often as a screen-grab, then resized, converted from JPGs to GIFs to PNGs of varying resolutions, contrast and color-adjusted on someone's uncalibrated monitor until the image is just plain digitally worn out. 

 

I'm using a few of those images below which I've revitalized the best I could in Photoshop until I get around to digitizing some new ones -- which will promptly be pirated from me by the same online galleries I just pirated from, but at least the art will look better for awhile.

The following are my Limited Edition Serigraphs and Giclées:

 

Limited Editions

Valley Series
Sketchbook
Early Cartoons
 

About Museum Board

The type of board I use for my art is a 4-ply Museum Board made from 100% cotton fiber which is acid-free and pH neutral, making it ideal for both art and art preservation purposes.  The reason it’s called Museum Board is because it is the preferred archival material used by most museums and galleries around the world.

It not only meets the strict Library of Congress Standards for image permanence, but provides an excellent and durable surface for all sorts of art media, particularly oil Pastels.  For those not familiar with the oil pastels, they are in essence hardened sticks of oil paint.  I prefer mineral-based Holbein oil pastels which are in my experience the best oil pastels in the world for consistency and colour permanence.

 

 


Not to be confused with powdery chalk pastels, oil pastels are opaque and cover surfaces almost as well as oil paint, except there is no drying time required as there is with oil paints.  I may go into the properties of oil paints and oil pastels in more detail later.

Scroll up for About Oil Pastels

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